CP: ElectroMagnetic Pulse (EMP)

September 18, 2015

in Contingency Plan

A Contingency Plan (CP) for ElectroMagnetic Pulse (EMP) will be a “continuity of function” type of plan. Generally, this plan addresses the overall failure of nearly all public utilities and infrastructure and that makes it valuable as a planning tool for many different scenarios. EMP as a high altitude nuclear event has the capacity to destroy delicate electronic circuits as well as large electrical transformers. This creates a double whammy of taking out control and communications equipment in addition to the power used to operate them and perhaps more importantly the power needed to repair damaged infrastructure. A series of ripple effects becomes possible where power fails, communications fail, transportation fails, utilities fail, and most if not all forms of modern economic production fail. The problem is compounded by the possibility that the failure may be widespread rather than local and for a much longer amount of time than normal emergencies. There will be little or no external help available and everybody becomes self sufficient, likely for many months and possibly for several years while repair operations get underway.

There are other scenarios that can cause all the failures that need to be dealt with by an EMP Contingency Plan (CP). Various parts of this plan have been supplied by other scenarios and adapted as needed. This CP might be related to the following scenarios and CPs:

CONTROLS (preventative measures and functions) from the following areas should be considered:

  • Planning
  • Knowledge Management
  • Resource Management
  • Communications
  • Process Improvement
  • Training and Awareness

INTRODUCTION
This contingency plan is designed to be used as an umbrella plan over many other sub-component contingency plans because of the wide range of this scenario. The scope of the plan is concerned primarily with [insert location here – family residence, business office, etc] and will need to be expanded. Sub-areas include electric power failure, water utility failure, failures in most if not all public utility and infrastructure areas. It must be assumed that normal transportation and communications may be disrupted and all forms of commerce, industry and agriculture are likely to be non-existent for a long period of time. An assumption is made at the beginning of the scenario that the geographic scope is wide and the time-frame is either long term or unlimited.

IMPACT ANALYSIS
Areas of failed function:

  • ELECTRIC POWER – including:
    • Electric lights
    • Air conditioning, electric heating, ceiling fans, heating system ignition and blowers (if heat is gas fueled)
    • Refrigerator, freezer, microwave, oven, gas stove ignitors
    • Electric tools (drills, saws)
  • UTILITY WATER SUPPLY
  • UTILITY NATURAL GAS SUPPLY
  • FOOD SUPPLY CHAIN
  • MEDICAL RESOURCES
  • COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS
  • MOST TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES

Impact Matrix – create a matrix with analysis of the importance and impact of the failed function according to your environment and situation.

  • Critical functions that use electric power
  • Water supply
  • All functions that use electric power
  • Food supply
  • Medical care
  • All emergency services (even FEMA)
  • Security services (police, law and order)

PROACTIVE ADJUSTMENT CONTROLS

  • PLANNING
    • Mission/Function/Process definition
    • Contingency Plan (this plan)
    • Impact analysis
    • Response plan
  • KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT
    • Knowledge Inventory (related to this plan)
    • Monitoring – of power sources
    • Alerts and advisories (weather forecasts and more)
    • Risk assessment
  • RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
    • Key resource list
    • Inventory of all backup items and resources
    • Faraday shielding – extra backup items that contain electronic circuits are stored inside a faradox box environment
    • Backup lights – battery powered LED flashlights in every room, candles and matches in kitchen near stove, butane lighter in bug-out bag
    • Power supply backups
    • Cooling – battery operated fans, charging unit, inverter, extension cords, portable AC unit
    • Heating – fireplace, matches/lighter, fuel supply (gas, wood, charcoal)
    • Cooking – gas stove top (matches, lighter), grill (propane fuel)
    • Electric tools – all battery operated, chargers, inverter, extension cords
    • Testing of backup items and resources [on regular schedule]
  • COMMUNICATIONS
    • Communications plan – must include severe restrictions on “normal” communications, assuming that all electronic based communications will be down, except for shielded backups
    • Communication backups that are shielded
    • Extra batteries and re-chargers that are usable (solar or manual cranked)
    • Contact list
    • Communications protocol for neighborhood, non-electronic communications (whistles, flags…
  • PHYSICAL SECURITY
    • Physical access control – manual
    • Physical access monitoring – manual
    • Security alert system – manual
  • OPERATIONAL SECURITY
    • Key information analysis
    • Monitoring for information disclosure
    • Vulnerability assessment (limited to OPSEC)
  • PROCESS IMPROVEMENT
    • Process improvement plan
    • Metrics
    • Testing
  • TRAINING AND AWARENESS
    • Awareness
    • Training
    • Practice and drills

REACTIVE STRATEGY CONTROLS

  • Activation and notification plan
  • Shutdown plan and checklist – designates devices to be shutdown, priority and schedule, arranged for use as a checklist
  • Energy conservation plan and checklist – a plan to minimize and prioritize the use of electric energy, arranged for use as a checklist
  • Restore plan and checklist – a plan for turning devices back on, priority and schedule, arranged for use as a checklist
  • Process improvement plan – process improvement methodology, tailored to collect data from this scenario, used to improve these processes, documented and included in this plan

CONTINGENCY PLAN

  • ACTIVATE AND NOTIFY
    • Warning notification – an early warning is not likely
    • Interval notification – when testing confirms an EMP, a notification is distributed, there are no further intervals
    • When each sub-component restores some level of functionality, an appropriate notification is distributed
    • All notifications are sent out to the word of mouth (person to person) communications tree list
  • ADJUST
    • Prepare – as a routine process, check backups and activate charging processes. If a warning is given, prepare for an outage using the shutdown list to turn off non-essential devices.
    • Activate and/or check backup power sources to make sure everything is working properly.
    • Shutdown – use the shutdown list to turn off devices running on backup power according to schedule and priority. Check and turn off switches to minimize power demand surge on restoration.
    • Conserve – use the shutdown list to prioritize power usage during the outage.
    • Monitor – according to the shutdown list schedule, make manual observations and use power for communications to check outage status.
  • RESTORE – use the restore checklist to turn devices back on according to priority and schedule. Check functionality. Use activation checklist for any notifications needed.
  • LEARN AND IMPROVE – take notes of processes that went well and problem areas. Apply process improvement plan to learn and improve. Feed back into training and practice.

NOTE – IT IS IMPORTANT FOR A PRINTED COPY(S) OF THIS PLAN (and sub-plans) TO BE EASILY AVAILABLE

CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDICES

  • Impact analysis
  • Inventory list (including backup resources)
  • Plan activation checklist
  • Notification contact list
  • Shutdown checklist (including conservation checklist)
  • Restore checklist
  • Testing procedures

[NOTE – this contingency plan outline is laid out from the perspective of a family residence and is limited by that viewpoint. It should not be considered as comprehensive for every environment or circumstance and parts of it are not completed because they are dependent upon scenario specific components. The plan needs to be completed for the environment and circumstances in which it is intended to operate.]

RELATED ARTICLES:
Contingency Plan
Making a Contingency Plan
Negative Events vs Positive Events
Scenario: Big Storm
JUMPSTART related articles
EMP related articles

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